Interpersonal Influence Inventory (III)

Do you know how you “come across” to others in your organization? The Interpersonal Influence Inventory (III) self-assessment identifies precisely that by evaluating your responses against two sets of factors known to affect one’s influence style:

Individual Factors

  • Past Experience — what we’ve learned about which behaviors lead to positive or negative results
  • Attitudes and Beliefs — the internal messages we send ourselves about how to act and react
  • Self-Confidence — our ability to stand up for ourselves and our rights in varying circumstances

Situational Factors

  • Rewards in the Environment — ways a work environment “encourages” desirable behaviors
  • Costs of Influence Style — ways a work environment “penalizes” undesirable behaviors
  • Norms, Rules and Laws — ways a work environment differentiates desirable and undesirable behaviors

The Results identify where you stand with respect to the four Interpersonal Influence Behavior Types:

Interpersonal Influence Inventory Behavior Types

Passive Behavior

  • Context: High consideration for others coupled with low openness with others.
  • Thoughts: Lacks confidence; believes others have rights but he/she does not.
  • Emotions: Feels victimized and depressed; holds resentment and anger inside.
  • Nonverbal Expression: Slumped posture, downcast eyes, nervous gestures, weak voice.
  • Verbal Expression: Belittles his/her opinions through qualifiers (“I’m probably wrong, but . . .”)

Assertive Behavior

  • Context: High consideration for others coupled with high openness with others.
  • Thoughts: Self-confident; believes in individual rights.
  • Emotions: Even tempered; directs feelings at situations, not people.
  • Nonverbal Expression: Direct eye contact, upright posture, appropriate tone of voice.
  • Verbal Expression: Clear, direct, concise; directly expresses views while being open to alternative views.

Concealed Aggressive Behavior

  • Context: Low consideration for others coupled with low openness with others.
  • Thoughts: Believes that s/he has rights but others do not; wants to get back at others in a devious manner.
  • Emotions: Hostility, anger, tension.
  • Nonverbal Expression: Rigid posture; glaring eye contact; icy, controlled behavior.
  • Verbal Expression: Indirect results and threats; gossip and sabotage are likely.

Openly Aggressive Behavior

  • Context: Low consideration for others coupled with high openness with others.
  • Thoughts: Believes that s/he has rights but others do not; wants to be in control at all times; not afraid of hurting others.
  • Emotions: Anger, hostility, resentment, stress, frustration.
  • Nonverbal Expression: Rigid posture or fighting stance, glaring eye contact, pointing finger and shaking fists.
  • Verbal Expression: Loud and haughty tone; uses insults and derogatory comments; direct, forceful, and rude; verbal abuse is common.

For over 20 years, this popular learning instrument – in its fourth edition – has helped thousands of professionals assess their own influence styles and work toward communicating more effectively. It can help you, too.

 


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